King’s March: The Shining by Stephen King

The Shining by Stephen KingI am a huge scaredy-pants. As a kid, I changed the channel as soon as Are You Afraid of the Dark came on TV. I steered clear away from the Goosebumps books at the library. In jr. high, I shook violently all through The Ring 2. When my friends decided to watch Saw at a high school sleepover, I spent most of the next two hours with my head under a blanket. For the next week, I slept with a night light. I scare easily, and I don’t like being scared. For this reason, I’ve never read a horror novel.

That said, 2014 is my Year of Reading Adventurously. I’ve read a romance novel and a graphic novel… so why not try a horror novel as well? When Wensend and Fourth Street Review announced King’s March, a month-long Stephen King reading event, I decided that now was the time to step outside of my comfort zone and read something scary. I chose to try The Shining because I’ve seen the movie (I actually love it, despite my usual aversion to anything scary) and I thought the book would be less scary if I already knew the story. Continue reading

Literary Love: Reading Romance for the First Time

Literary LoveLiterary Love 2014 is a week dedicated to all things book love-ish. Link up any post showing love to a book, author, etc and feel free to grab our button & use our hashtag, #LiteraryLove14.

Read more about this event at Love at First Book

I have never been one for romance. I don’t read romance novels, and I prefer the literary fiction I read to be light on the love. Call me a cynic, but boy-meets-girl stories usually just make me feel eye-roll-y. But one of my reading resolutions for this year is to read more diversely. I intended this to mean I would read more literature by people who aren’t white Americans, but it SHOULD also mean trying out genres I’m unfamiliar with. When I learned about the Literary Love event, I decided it was the perfect time to try reading a romance novel! I can’t TELL you how far out of my comfort zone this was, but I did it! Continue reading

Book Review: The Encyclopedia of Early Earth by Isabel Greengerg

Book Review: Burial Rights by Hannah KentTHE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF EARLY EARTH
by Isabel Greenberg

Graphic novel
Little, Brown; Oct, 3, 2013
Hardcover; 176 pages
Source: Purchased

I’m declaring 2014 the Year of Reading Widely. As I wrote in my Reading Resolutions post, I’m making an effort to read more diversely — reading genres outside my comfort zone, translated works, and books by authors who aren’t white. I’ve been doing pretty well so far! I’ve read a few books by authors of color, and I got three more from the library this week. I also read my first romance novel, and I just finished my first graphic novel!

I bought a copy of The Encyclopedia of Early Earth by Isabel Greenberg after reading River City Reading’s review. I’ve never been interested in graphic novels because I associated them with comic books, so I was really interested to read Shannon’s review of this book. The Bookrageous Podcast has also made me interested in the form recently. To top it off, this month is Graphic Novels/Comics February! It seemed like the perfect opportunity to try reading something outside of my comfort zone. Continue reading

Jazz Age January: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Book Review: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott FizgeraldTHE GREAT GATSBY
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Fiction, Classics
Scribner, 1925
Paperback; 180 pages
Source: Purchased

I hadn’t planned on re-reading The Great Gatsby, but after finishing Careless People, a book about Gatsby‘s creation, I couldn’t resist! I’ve read this book twice before, and I was eager to re-read it hot on the heals of a book about the factors that influenced its writing.

I wrote about this book last time I read it, two years ago, but I thought I’d revisit it for Jazz Age January! This post contains spoilers.

Continue reading

Jazz Age January: The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fizgerald

Book Review: The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott FitzgeraldTHE BEAUTIFUL AND DAMNED
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Fiction
Vintage; 1920
Paperback; 388 pages
Source: Purchased

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s second novel centers around Anthony Patch and his beautiful wife Gloria. Inspired by Scott and Zelda themselves, this couple live wildly in 1920s New York, seeking pleasure at any cost.

Anthony, a would-be aristocrat waiting for his inheritance, spends his bachelor days at clubs, attending raucous parties, and entertaining women. When he meets Gloria, a beautiful golden girl bursting with life, he immediately falls in love with her. The two marry and proceed to have as grand a time as possible.  Continue reading

Jazz Age January: The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

Book Review: Burial Rights by Hannah KentTHE PARIS WIFE
by Paula McLain

Fiction: Historical
Ballantine Books; 2011
Audio (Paperback: 314 pages)
Source: Library

It’s 1920 in Chicago, and the parties are swinging, but 28-year-old Hadley Richardson has nearly given up on finding love and a happy marriage. The tides turn when she meets a young Ernest Hemingway, who sweeps her off her feet. After a whirlwind marriage, they marry and move to Paris, where they fall in with an artistic crowd later known as the Lost Generation.

The Paris Wife is the story of Hadley, Ernest Hemingway’s first wife, during their time in Paris. Through her perspective, we experience the wild parties of the 20s and get to know some of the Jazz Age’s major figures, including Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, and Ezra Pound. Continue reading

On The Awakening and Spending Time Alone

The Awakening by Kate ChopinI recently finished reading The Awakening for my Modern American Lit class, and I really loved it.  Apart from being revolutionary for it’s time — a woman who has sex out of wedlock and doesn’t get pregnant? What?! — it’s really beautifully written.

Take my favorite line from the novel. As Edna begins distancing herself from her husband and abandoning her womanly duties, she takes to walking through the streets of New Orleans, enjoying the sunlight and the warm fresh air. Chopin writes,

“She discovered many a sunny, sleepy corner, fashioned to dream in. And she found it good to dream and to be alone and unmolested.” Continue reading