Jazz Age January: Week 5 Linkup and Wrap Up

jazzageHello there flappers and fellas! Can you believe this is the final linkup for Jazz Age January?! Thank you so much to everyone who has participated. When I came up with this event, I thought maybe five people would sign up. You guys blew my expectations out of the water. I’m excited to announce that 24 bloggers have participated, sharing a total of 52 posts about 22 different books!

I had a lot of fun with this reading challenge. It pushed me to read a few books on my Classics Club list, re-read an old favorite, and learn more about the jazz age and its authors. I hope Jazz Age January broadened some of your horizons, too! Continue reading

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Jazz Age January: Week 4 Linkup

jazzageHello there all you jazz babies! This week has been frightfully cold, but I’ve been Charleston-ing my little jazz heart out to keep warm. (Not to mention drinking a hot toddy or two.)

Since last week’s post, I’ve read a tiny bit of Nancy Milford’s biography of Zelda Fitzgerald, Zelda. My mind has been wandering from the non-fiction, though, and it’s taking me an awfully long time to read!

This week I wrote about The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I also swapped Jazz Age January/Feminist Sunday posts with Elena of Books and Reviews; she wrote a guest post about Zelda Fitzgerald for my blog, and I wrote a post about how women’s social roles changed in the ’20s for her blog!

Now let’s here about your reading! Last week, 15 of you linked up posts! Continue reading

Jazz Age January Meets Feminist Sundays

Happy Sunday lovelies! We’ve got something a little special going on over here this weekend. One of my good blogging friends, Elena of Books and Reviews, had the brilliant idea of writing a pair of crossover posts for my Jazz Age January reading challenge and her Feminist Sundays feature. We each wrote a post about feminists and feminism of the 1920s, and I’m thrilled to be hosting her post about Zelda Fitzgerald. You can find my post, about how women’s social roles changed in the ’20s, over on her blog!jaj fs

Continue reading

Jazz Age January: Week 3 Linkup

jazzageHello guys and dolls! I hope you’ve been keeping warm with some bathtub gin — and tasty books, of course — this very cold week.

Since last week’s post, I’ve been slowly reading Zelda, Nancy Milford’s biography of Zelda Fitzgerald. The text in my copy of the book is REALLY tiny, and I can’t read it for very long periods of time, so I’m taking my time and reading a few other books, as well. I can’t seem to settle on anything this week! I’m still very behind on my reviews, but this week I wrote about Careless People: Murder, Mayhem, and the Invention of The Great Gatsby by Sarah Churchwell. It’s a fascinating biography of The Great Gatsby and a brilliant portrait of 1920s New York.

Now let’s here about your reading! Last week, 13 of you linked up posts! Continue reading

Jazz Age January: Week 2 Linkup

jazzageHello flappers and fellas! We’re onto week 2 of Jazz Age January, and I’ve been having a ball. I’m really enjoying reading a lot of different books about the jazz age, as well as your posts about your own reading!

Since last week’s linkup, I have read Carless People: Murder, Mayhem, and the Invention of the Great Gatsby by Sarah Churchwell and The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I hadn’t planned on reading Gatsby, but after reading 350 pages about its creation, I couldn’t help myself! I’m a bit behind on my reviews, though; this week, I wrote about last week’s reading of A Moveable Feast by Earnest Hemingway. Continue reading

Jazz Age January: Week 1 Linkup

jazzageHello darlings! I hope Jazz Age January has gotten off to a splendid start for all of you! (If this is the first you’re hearing of this reading challenge, head on over to the start page to learn more; it’s not too late to sign up!)

So far I have read A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway and The Beautiful and Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I don’t think A Moveable Feast was a very good place to start reading Hemingway’s work, but I mostly enjoyed the experience. It felt very disorienting to go from Hemingway’s writing to Fitzgerald’s; the difference in their styles is incredible! Continue reading

Jazz Age January: Let the Wild Rumpus Start!

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Happy New Year, everyone! I hope you all had a fabulous time last night and your speakeasies didn’t get raided. (We’re pretending it’s the ’20s, right?) I’m beyond excited to rouge my knees and roll my stockings down and read ALL THAT JAZZ-age stuff.

About:

In case you missed it, I posted an informational/sign-up post for Jazz Age January last month. If you haven’t signed up but would like to participate, no worries! Everyone is welcome. Just as a quick rehash of what this challenge is all about, I’m inviting bloggers to read books related to the Jazz Age during the month of January. Readers are welcome to read novels written by Jazz Age authors, non-fiction about the ’20s, and contemporary fiction set during this time period. Check out the sign-up post for a list of recommended titles, but please don’t limit yourself to those books! Anything ’20s goes. Continue reading

Jazz Age January: Sign Up

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Step right up guys and dolls, Bettys and old boys, flappers and fellas! The year is winding down and I want to party like it’s 1925.

I’ve been in a Roaring ’20s spirit lately, and I’ve decided to run with it. I’ve never hosted an event on my blog before, but I’m excited to announce my first! Get ready for Jazz Age January. I have a feeling it’s going to be the bees knees… the cat’s pajamas, if you will. I’m nearly copacetic with excitement. (How much ’20s slang can I fit in one blog post? Let’s find out.)

Know Your Onions (or what this baloney is all about):

I’m inviting bloggers to read books related to the Jazz Age during the month of January. Readers are welcome to read novels written by Jazz Age authors, non-fiction about the ’20s, and contemporary fiction set during this time period.

Continue reading